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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
't buying in. listen to house speaker john boehner's reaction. >> despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. >> didn't take very long for democrats to hit back at speaker boehner. senate majority leader harry reid got up, a little personal. >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. >> i don't understand his brain. let's go to washington this morning. wow, just when we thought they were getting closer seems like they're even farther apart this morning. >> yeah, you know, the nice talk from right after the election is all gone. one of the big sticking points is something you just mentioned which is this whole idea of taxes. republicans and democrats continue to disagree over how to raise tax revenue. should they end the bush tax cuts for the very wealthy as democrats want to do? should they close loopholes, cap deductions, raise the taxes on capital gains and dividends or some combination of all of those? there's even disagreement right now on just how much money -- how much in revenue t
page. you have that proposal put forward by speaker john boehner that calls for $800 billion in new tax revenue, but some conservatives think that republicans are giving up too much. take a listen. >> republicans should not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> look, i support the speaker and we're actually not very far apart on anything. you know at the end of the day, he has to negotiate a deal. if there is an area we do agree with the president on, that is 98% of the american people getting about 80% of this tax cut shouldn't have their taxes raised. my suggestion was let's take the one area we agree and take it off the table. >> now later this morning, president obama will be speaking and taking questions at the business round table meeting, a white house official saying that the president will make the case that middle-class americans need certainty that their taxes will not go up at the end of the year. he will also make the case that this fiscal cliff will have a negative i
. but at least the two sides are talking, by phone. not face to face. house speaker john boehner and the president are hoping to break the fiscal cliff ice. now we're just mixing metaphors, left and right. speaking on the phone, 26 days left, of course, until we tumble over the cliff or slide down the slope or fall off the precipice or however you want to put it. we could, of course, face massive tax hikes, spending cuts. that's what the fiscal cliff is all about. it would all start with the start of the new year. i want to get to senator jeff merkley. he's a democrat from the state of oregon. he's on both the budget committee and the banking, housing, and urban affairs committee. nice to have you with us, sir. thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> thank you. before we get to fiscal cliff, let's talk a little bit about syria. there are now reports that they may be loading the components that would make up sarin gas. and i'm curious to know and i think a lot of people are watching this, does this mean that we are headed, the united states is headed into military action cons
not really good language you're hearing soledad. house speaker john boehner said he found the proposal flabbergasting. he said it's not serious. but you definitely have the white house here and democrats feeling that they have some leverage. they look at polls that show americans are more prepared to blame republicans because of the impasse and also the fact that the consequences of the fiscal cliff, these spending cuts and these tax -- pardon me the spending cuts and the tax increases that kick in here at the end of the year, the consequences are very dire and following the election the white house and democrats think that they can really push republicans into a corner here. >> brianna keilar for us. thank you. just ahead we're going to be talking with connecticut senator richard blumenthal will join us to talk a little bit about the democrats' responsibility about this impending fiscal cliff. another story we're following, friends and family of kansas city chiefs jovan belcher looking for answers this morning after he killed his girlfriend and then took his own life. his team took to
in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different than what's on the table there. $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that is two times the amount in the boehner plan, and also, of course, includes increasing those income tax rates for the wealthy. $400 billion to medicare and other entitlements, that's $ 00 billion less than in the speaker's counteroffer and this would force congress to give up its debt limit vote which is a nonstarter for house republicans. the white house saying that boehner counteroffer is nothing new, that it lacks specifics. but i will tell you, z
comments made by president obama and house speaker john boehner, both expressing optimism on fiscal cliff negotiations in the washington. in a new report from the congressional budget office it says more than half a trillion has been spent on jobless benefits over the past five years. $520 billion in jobless benefits in five years. also part of the debate, whether to extend the deadline to file for additional unemployment benefits beyond the end of the year. spending on food stamps is rising. nearly 15 million households received food stampses in 2011, up 10% from the year before according to new data from the census bureau. it shows you the far reach of the government right now in the safety net in supporting american families. all of that at the core of the debate of what's happening with the fiscal cliff. >>> $7 coffee. starbucks thinks you will pay. coffee connoisseurs can pay $7 for a grande cup of costa rica fincapalamara. it's called mucho deneiro. cultivated from a central american bean known as geisha. it is extremely difficult to produce. the same america who spends $7 on lotter
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)